Design

  • The Trouble with Blood
    Blood is a particularly tricky fluid to handle. There are primarily four reasons for this: coagulation, haemolysis, availability and behaviour. The challenges associated with each of these items are highlighted below. Coagulation. When blood is outside the body, it will coagulate at every opportuni...
    (October, 2011)
  • Designing a Fluid Handling System
    Strategies for designing a reliable, repeatable fluid handling system.
    (October, 2011)
  • When Does Software Become a Medical Device?
    Forthcoming EU guidance is expected to clarify the status of stand-alone medical software, but why wait? International standards offer a commonsense route to compliance.
    (October, 2011)
  • Developing and Commercialising Companion Diagnostics
    An overview of the technology and key success factors of companion diagnostics, including case studies highlighting the challenges of developing viable products.
    (September, 2011)
  • A Noninterchangeable Connector for Central Venous Pressure Lines
    This article discusses a new type of connector designed to prevent the unintentional administration of drugs.
    (September, 2011)
  • Building Better Bonds Using Light-Cure Adhesives
    The use of light-cure adhesives can optimise product assembly and reduce material waste, thereby achieving cost savings in the production process without affecting quality.
    (September, 2011)
  • Sagentia at 25: Medical Innovation at the Speed of Light
    Tech company Sagentia celebrates 25 years of innovation in medical technology this month. Robin Lee, Head of IP Exploitation and Technology, reflects on the role the company has played in the development of diode-based medical devices and the opportunities and challenges yet to come.
    (August, 2011)
  • How a Virtual Scalpel Overcame Real-World Challenges
    A MEMS-based mass flow controller was instrumental in the successful development of a plasma-based surgery system.
    (August, 2011)
  • Heating Devices Enhance Operation of Medical Equipment
    Electric heaters are used to enhance the operation of various forms of medical and diagnostic equipment. By understanding the product requirements, heater alternatives can be used that simplify medical device design and procurement while reducing size and cost.
    (August, 2011)
  • 3-D Printing Enables Early Design Verification
    A medical device design and production company dramatically reduced its time to market by using 3-D printing to visualise concepts and to test product design and functionality.
    (July, 2011)
  • Medical MEMS: How Motion Sensing Is Transforming Next-Generation Medical Device Designs
    MEMS-based systems can significantly improve accuracy in aligning hip and knee implants with a patient’s anatomy, reducing discomfort and the need for revision surgery.
    (May, 2011)
  • Motion Control Systems: A Drive for Perfection
    Advances in stepper motor designs and controls open new possibilities in medical technology and laboratory applications.
    (May, 2011)
  • Building a Better Stroke Detector
    The P3SENS multidisciplinary consortium aims to develop a biosensor that can detect a stroke sufficiently early to prevent the occurrence of ischemic damage and preserve quality of life.
    (May, 2011)
  • IEC 60601-1 Surge Tester Calibration and Check Testing
    In addition to helpful techniques that simplify surge testing, this article includes easy-to-implement procedures to ensure that the defibrillation-proof surge tester is working correctly in-between calibration cycles.
    (April, 2011)
  • Micropumps for Infusion Therapy
    Micropumps can be an attractive alternative to standard pumps because of their size, weight and low energy demand. This article describes one micropump, in particular, which offers the possibility of intrinsic flow control, thereby fulfilling requirements for safety and accuracy under varying condit...
    (March, 2011)
  • Sensors that Measure Up
    Medical respiration measurements can be improved by using a flow-based differential pressure sensor.
    (March, 2011)
  • Medical Device Design at a Crossroads
    This year’s Medical Design Excellence Awards saw a strong showing from international entrants. Manufacturers in China and India, in particular, are finding novel ways to cut costs without affecting quality.
    (March, 2011)
  • Innovations in the Biofunctionalisation and Terminal Sterilisation of Medical Devices
    New enabling technologies are driving growth in the biological products market.
    (March, 2011)
  • RFID Inside: Reinventing Navigation Technology for the OR
    Complex surgical interventions can be performed faster with fewer postoperative complications when surgeons use state-of-the-art navigation technology. Uptake has been limited, however, because of mechanical limitations and cost. New RFID-based navigation systems address those issues.
    (March, 2011)
  • The Addictive Allure of Supercomputing
    EMDT's series of interviews offers personal perspectives on the diverse industries that serve the medtech sector. Here, we talk to Andrew Jones.
    (March, 2011)
  • MEDTEC Europe Preview: Aid for Postoperative Care after Sternotomy Surgery Developed
    MMID is a unique no-nonsense Dutch design agency that applies itself to the development of achievable and successful products in which functionality, manufacturability and design are totally attuned to each other. MMID’s services are targeted at the international healthcare market. The firm&rs...
    (March, 2011)
  • Fundamentals of Medical-Grade Power Supplies
    When sourcing a power supply for your device, begin by determining how and where the product will be used.
    (March, 2011)
  • The Advantages of Strain Gauge Technology
    Custom strain gauge sensing technology enhances patient experiences in everything from robotic surgical systems to mammography machines.
    (March, 2011)
  • Understanding Superconductivity
    Research in high-temperature superconductivity may lead to more-affordable MRI scanners.
    (February, 2011)
  • The First Million Bucks
    Medical device companies spend around 1 million euros at the front end of every device development project to get to a product concept that they believe in (at least on paper). Some spend it better than others.
    (February, 2011)